Waffres

Waffers, or wafers, were enormously popular in the Middle Ages, and were very similar to our modern waffle. In cities & towns, wafer sellers (called wafereres) would stand on street corners, making wafers for customers passing by using an iron form resembling our old-fashioned waffle iron. The original recipe has as one of its main ingredients the womb of a pike, and it is thereby assumed that this wafer was originally intended to be eaten on a fish-day or during Lent. Caviar may make an interesting substitute, but this is essentially an unnecessary ingredient and has been left out of the modern version. And because this was a fish-day item, the egg yolks were left out of the period receipt; I've included them in the modern version.

Ingredients:

1 dozen eggs, beaten
3 cups flour
1/3 cup sugar
1 tbs. ginger
1 1/2 cup grated Cheddar cheese
1/2 tsp. salt

Preparation:

Gode Cookery Translation: Wafers. Take the womb of a pike (luce), & boil it well, & mash it in a mortar, & add tender cheese, grind them well; then take flour and egg whites & beat together, then take sugar and ginger, & mix all together, & see that the egg is hot, & make a batter, & make the wafers, and serve.

Beat together all ingredients to make a thick batter. Make the wafers by using a modern waffle iron and prepare according to the directions for your machine. Be careful - the cheese will melt while baking, so keep an eye on things and oil or spray & clean your iron as necessary. The finished wafers should be light brown.

Serving:

Serve hot or cold, with honey as a garnish.

Credits:

Austin, Thomas. 
Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books. Harleian MS. 279 & Harl. MS. 4016, with extracts from Ashmole MS. 1429, Laud MS. 553, & Douce MS 55. London: for The Early English Text Society by N. Trubner & Co., 1888.